How to MATCH numbers formatted as text in Excel

You will sometimes encounter errors while trying to MATCH or LOOKUP data in Excel if your numbers are formatted as numbers in one of your tables, and as text in another table. While special formats are available in Excel, they are relatively rarely used and are limited. Some “numbers” such as identification numbers are more often stored as text. This is done in order to add leading zeros, hyphens and other characters to that numbers. However, if we try to

RANK functions

Ranking is data transformation in which values are replaced by their rank when the data is sorted. For any two items, the first is either ranked higher than ranked lower than ranked equal to the second. Values can be ranked from the smallest, or from the largest.   Ordinal ranking presumes that all items will receive distinct ordinal numbers, including items that compare equal. Distinct ordinal numbers for items that are equal can be assigned arbitrarily, but it is also

SMALL & LARGE functions

The SMALL function returns the k-th smallest number from an array of numbers. The SMALL function syntax is as follows: = SMALL ( array; k ) Array can be any row, column, or a combination of both. k is an integer number representing the position of a number in the array if data in that array would be sorted from the smallest.   Consider the following example: If k is 1, the smallest number will be returned. If k is

Nesting formulas, functions and conditional statements in the SUMIFS criteria

We’ve previously established what are the rules of writing criteria in the SUMIFS function: we can reference any cell we can enter any number directly in the function we can enter text directly in the function, nested inside of quotation marks [“”] logical test is nested inside of quotation marks [“”], with comparison operator coming first and a number second. The story however does not end there, and advanced users can do even more with the SUMIFS function.   We

Combining SUMIFS with INDEX MATCH

You will sometimes want to retrieve data from a table with values both in rows and columns and based on multiple (three or more criteria). There is, as usual, more than one way to do this. However, most of those ways require you to use something called array formulas – in essence, you will have to press Ctrl Shift Enter combination on your keyboard every time you want to calculate that formula. Combining SUMIFS with INDEX MATCH enables us to

Generating a series of dates with the EOMONTH function

You will sometimes need to generate a series of dates in Excel. Most often you will need month-end dates, but no matter what kind of dates you need, the simplest way to generate them will include the EOMONTH function. The EOMONTH function returns the last day of the month in relation to the start date.   The EOMONTH function syntax is as follows: = EOMONTH ( start_date; number of months ) Start date is any given date, such as 31.12.2020.